FAQ שאלות נפוצות

Frequently Asked Questions

Does your pet need the doctor? Can it wait or should you call now?

Click to find the answer in Dr Mollie’s frequently asked questions.

Click on the list item below to read the answer.

Don’t find the answer to your question? – feel free to call 0542662406.

האם חיית המחמד שלך צריך רופא? אפשר לחכות או צריך רופא עכשיו?

לחץ על השאלה ברשימה כדי לקרוא את התשובה. 

לא מצאת תשובה לשאלתיך? – אל תהסס להתקשר לד״ר מולי 0542662406 .

FAQs



Yes, your pet needs a yearly physical exam and booster vaccines tailored to its age and lifestyle

Newly adopted pets should see Dr.Mollie right away! Arrange a visit to get started correctly with socialization, training, parasite control and nutrition even if the pet is too young for vaccines


The vaccines against dangerous viruses should be given soon after weaning at 7-8 weeks and every 3-4 weeks until over 16 weeks for strong protection, especially against “parvo”. Rabies vaccine is required by law to be given between 3-6 months for puppies. Kittens should be vaccinated against dangerous virus starting at 7-8 weeks and given another dose every 3-4 weeks with the last booster after 16 weeks according to current research. Both puppies and kittens should be dewormed on adoption and 10-14 days later, then every 6 months or as fecal testing indicates


Routine surgical removal of the reproductive organs is usually done just before puberty, around 5-6 months for cats and small dogs, and 6-7 months for larger dogs. When and whether to spay/neuter larger dogs is a complicated issue-and not just for those sensitive to halacha. Arrange a discussion with Dr Mollie to make informed choices for your pet


Most Orthodox Rabbis prohibit surgical castration of male animals and permit spaying female animals through a non-Jewish surgeon. This restriction is based on a verse in the Torah. Those who follow Halacha should discuss the issue with their Rabbi and their veterinarian. Nonsurgical contraception for pets exists and may be a good option for religious pet owners. Dr. Mollie does not perform spay and neuter surgeries, but will refer you to a colleague you can trust


If the cat is still eating, it is likely a virus and may pass without medical intervention. If the cat stops eating or seems ill, make an appointment


Cats can get very ill, even die, when they stop eating for whatever reason. A cat that hasn’t eaten for more than a day should be seen






If she is 5-7 months old and not yet spayed, this could be a normal heat or estrus cycle. Any other case could be neurological disease and should be examined quickly


Dogs often eat things they shouldn’t and then vomit it back up. Vomiting more than twice in a day especially if there is also lack of appetite or blood in the vomit could be serious, call for an appointment

Occasional vomiting of hair is normal. Other vomiting should be evaluated promptly



Try to catch a clean urine sample in a plastic cup and have the pet examined. For cats it will likely be necessary to collect a sample so please keep them confined with no litter box for a few hours before the exam


Itchy skin could be fleas or lots of other things. Fleas are small brown bugs that crawl quickly and jump. You can use a lice comb and if you find bugs or what looks like pepper that likely means fleas. If you have treated for fleas and they are still itchy or you don’t find fleas, make an appointment so your pet can stop suffering


Yes, your pet needs a yearly physical exam and booster vaccines tailored to its age and lifestyle

The vaccines against dangerous viruses should be given soon after weaning at 7-8 weeks and every 3-4 weeks until over 16 weeks for strong protection, especially against “parvo”. Rabies vaccine is required by law to be given between 3-6 months for puppies. Kittens should be vaccinated against dangerous virus starting at 7-8 weeks and given another dose every 3-4 weeks with the last booster after 16 weeks according to current research. Both puppies and kittens should be dewormed on adoption and 10-14 days later, then every 6 months or as fecal testing indicates

Newly adopted pets should see Dr.Mollie right away! Arrange a visit to get started correctly with socialization, training, parasite control and nutrition even if the pet is too young for vaccines

Routine surgical removal of the reproductive organs is usually done just before puberty, around 5-6 months for cats and small dogs, and 6-7 months for larger dogs. When and whether to spay/neuter larger dogs is a complicated issue-and not just for those sensitive to halacha. Arrange a discussion with Dr Mollie to make informed choices for your pet

Most Orthodox Rabbis prohibit surgical castration of male animals and permit spaying female animals through a non-Jewish surgeon. This restriction is based on a verse in the Torah. Those who follow Halacha should discuss the issue with their Rabbi and their veterinarian. Nonsurgical contraception for pets exists and may be a good option for religious pet owners. Dr. Mollie does not perform spay and neuter surgeries, but will refer you to a colleague you can trust

If the cat is still eating, it is likely a virus and may pass without medical intervention. If the cat stops eating or seems ill, make an appointment

Cats can get very ill, even die, when they stop eating for whatever reason. A cat that hasn’t eaten for more than a day should be seen

This can quickly become an emergency, call for an appointment
This can be a urinary blockage which is an emergency, call for an appointment
This could be a twisted stomach emergency-get it seen right away
 If she is 5-7 months old and not yet spayed, this could be a normal heat or estrus cycle. Any other case could be neurological disease and should be examined quickly 

Dogs often eat things they shouldn’t and then vomit it back up. Vomiting more than twice in a day especially if there is also lack of appetite or blood in the vomit could be serious, call for an appointment

Occasional vomiting of hair is normal. Other vomiting should be evaluated promptly 
Mazal tov on adopting a pet! Do you have questions about proper care? Arrange a visit and we will talk about what your new pet needs to be happy and healthy. Any new pet should have bright and shiny eyes, a good appetite, and be active, with no discharge from eyes, nose, or ears. If something doesn’t look right, call Dr Mollie at 0542662406
 Try to catch a clean urine sample in a plastic cup and have the pet examined. For cats it will likely be necessary to collect a sample so please keep them confined with no litter box for a few hours before the exam 
Fleas, ticks, and worms are not just gross, they can cause discomfort and diseases and some can even jump to infest people! Fortunately modern parasite control is easier than ever and may involve routine deworming medication, spot-on flea and tick control, and injections against spirocerca (tolaat ha park). Dr Mollie will help you choose products that will work and are right for your pet and your family.